Sameeksha Bansal, Author at Start-Up Hyderabad - Page 3 of 3
Loading Startup Hyderabad

Tips for Networking better.

Business Communication Duplicate model

We are a social species. Which means, among other things, that we need to be meeting and getting along with people from all walks of life. And this applies not just to the personal sphere. Your work life is no different, meeting people and making contacts are a very important part  of the professional culture. One common and popular  way to make this happen is ‘networking’. It’s a familiar concept. If I had to guess, I’d say you’ve come across this word at least three times already in the day so far! Today, building a network comes a close second if not at the same level as building a business or a product. A good network can catapult your efforts in making your idea come to life. The catch? Building the said Network. The bare truth is, that building a worthwhile network is not easy. It’s time consuming and involves a lot of hard work. More so if you’re not very comfortable doing it. Networking at business events and meets is very un-nerving for introverts, even for people who claim to be comfortable working a crowd. Here are some pointers that should make your next event experience easy and worth your while in making contacts.

1. Arrive Early. This is for those who are starting out with the whole networking exercise and for those who are not very comfortable talking in large crowds. Arriving early to events, has a two-fold advantage. One, it allows you to get comfortable with the surroundings and gently eases you into networking with the few people available then. Arriving later can put you out of your element when small groups have already formed and you don’t know who to join. Two, because of the thin crowd in the beginning, you get the opportunity to build stronger contacts. You can spend 5-10 minutes with each person, allowing you to leave a long lasting impression.

2. Have an agenda. Take some time to figure out the kind of people to expect at the meet up. Use this information to see how some of these people can benefit you. Have answers to questions like “How can I help you?” ready. When you are presented with the chance to answer this question, don’t blank out. In the same context, ask open ended questions. Questions like ‘Why, Who, How, When” etc are good examples of open ended questions. These questions invite long answers and thus provide a good opportunity for a conversation starter. You want to avoid questions that can be answered with a mere Yes or No.

3. Business Card. Always have a business card handy. At the end of an event, people most likely collect a lot of business cards, for which they may not have the patience to remember. One tip is to make your card catchy and interesting – something that invites a second glance right when you hand the card. A tip for students: At a meet up for all things gaming, I met a design student who had a neat little trick up his sleeve: His business card read “ You met me at _______” and he had filled out the name of the event. Days later when I came across his card, I remembered him. But do remember: catchy does not mean flashy. Your business card should reflect the business you’re in.

4. Dress Well. Nobody is going to tell you this, but I will. Take the extra minute or two to evaluate how you look for an event. It’s not about showing off, it’s about making an impression. A clean and tidy t-shirt makes a better one than a stained and crumpled shirt.

5. Take a Friend. This is not so much of a tip than a suggestion. If going to these meetup’s alone is scary, take a friend. That way you already know one person there. It’ll do wonders for your confidence level. Make the event a contest with your friend: who can speak to more people.

6. Listen & Follow-Up. The urge for talking about yourself and your work while networking is strong, try and keep it curbed. Why? Listening is also a major networking tool. You want the other person to know you are genuinely interested in what they do. Always remember to follow up. The general thumb rule is to reach out via email within 48 hours of networking. Here, instead of a simple ‘Hello”, you could talk about a mutual interest that was discussed at the event. This improves your chances greatly in getting a reply.

7. Same Boat. Lastly, always remember that as much as half the people at any event are in the same boat as you. They are also nervous and unsure on how to network.

Jumpstarting Careers for Women

00-jumpstart-your-career-20-helpful-infographics-on-job-search

It can be a daunting experience to look for a new job. Even more if you have a break in your career. This is generally applicable to women who take a break in their career for various reasons. Getting your career back on track can get difficult. Not all companies take a break in career positively and it can influence their current hiring decisions. Today, however there are options for women looking to restart their career – or even change career verticals. Lets look at some of these options:

Springboard by Microsoft: Having two batches underway, Microsoft is soon starting the third wave of their Springboard program. This program offers an internship to selected women to jumpstart their careers. Microsoft has listed a minimum of a year’s break and a minimum of 4 years of continuous employment to be eligible for this program. Also, all openings in the Springboard program are technical in nature. After the completion of the internship the candidate can interview for a full time position with Microsoft. You can read more about this program here.

Dr. Reddy’s Comeback Careers for Women: Dr. Reddy’s also recognises the talent opportunities in women looking to resume their career life after a sabbatical. Unlike the Springboard program by Microsoft, these opportunities are full time with Dr. Reddy’s. They list the openings and women with a break in their career can apply. The openings are across all verticals and departments. The promise Dr. Reddy’s makes is to not let the career break influence their decision in hiring. You can look at the opportunities available here.

Second Career Internship Program by TATA: Tata launched SCIP way back in 2008 and defines it as a Career transition Management program for women. They also need women to have a minimum of 6 months and a maximum of 8 years break in their career. This program works a little differently. The program is based per project and they have a certain number of flexible hours the applicant needs to complete for the project. The project is location based. Applicants can apply based on a listed project or simply register for any upcoming projects that suit their profile. Visit this link for more information.

The fact that there are such opportunities available is testimony enough to the direction employers are taking in making their work place as positive as possible. Comment and let us know if you know of any other such programs or if you have personally experienced one yourself. We would love to hear about your experience.

Digital presence – Personal Brand building.

Digital-Footprint

“Don’t think you are. Know you are.” This quote by Morpheus from The Matrix has always stayed with me and I find it apt for this post on owning and managing your digital being. For us today, simply existing in the real world is not enough. We also need to have an online presence that resonates with who we really are. These days, many people will look you up online before they meet you in person. It is this digital profile that creates people’s perceptions and expectations before actually meeting you in person. From business associates, clients, potential employers to investors, founders, and incubators, everybody makes sure to take a look at your social profile before forming an opinion. And it’s not like there is anything you can do practically to avoid this. Unless you are literally living under a rock, you will invariably have a digital presence. Then why not take control of what it reflects?

As a simple exercise, do a quick search with your name and see what pops up. Do you like everything you see? Do you believe it stands for an accurate representation of you? You can begin to build your brand from there. Keep in mind these basic guidelines:

Personal or Business. It can get a little hard to maintain the difference between personal accomplishments to business networking. But this is important. A good place to start is to keep these tools separate. For example, LinkedIn is a social network for professional contacts. What you share there should be strictly business. Engage in knowledgeable conversations and post work related updates. Twitter is another good example. Sharing a witty update here is actually quite alright. Of course, there might be a situation that, although is personal, the accomplishment is worth sharing everywhere. For example, if you’ve done a vigorous and challenging trek – you could share it on your professional network.

Consistency. You’ll probably hear a lot of this word. And that’s good, because this is a very important aspect of managing your digital presence. Whatever you choose to post, consistency is the key. Consistency across all your profiles in the digital world acts as a positive signal for anyone who looks you up.

Promote Yourself. There is no shame in a little self promotion. I’d even go as far as saying it’s healthy for you. What this means is capitalise on any opportunity to promote yourself. If you’ve written an article or are speaking at a conference – no matter how small or big. Find out if you can get the video clip of your session. Use this. If you have a little (or big) award from somewhere, a letter of appreciation from someone important, don’t hide it away. Feel free to let others know about your accomplishments.

Keep your profile information up to date. It is very easy to forget about the endless profiles you have and never update them. This should be avoided. Either have a very limited set of social media profiles or make sure they are all linked to be updated simultaneously. It does not bode well to see a twitter profile that was last active 5 months ago. Always make sure that your current work information is up-to-date. Professional networks like LinkedIn or Behance need to be current. Be aware of what is written about you. Set up alerts for any mention of your name in the digital world. You should know what your profile goes into and if you approve of it.

Blogging. Having and maintaining a blog is a whole category to itself. A blog is an extremely powerful tool to have for your personal brand. A well maintained blog gives the reader a very positive insight about the author. That said, a blog is not for everybody. Don’t have one for the sake of having one. A poorly written blog can do more harm than not having one.  

A key tip to remember is not to project a certain personality that you like onto your digital presence. Try and keep it as close as you can to your real self.

Thinking of working in a Start-Up? Read on.

working-at-a-startup-750x422

Achtung! The Startup fever is high and they are on the lookout for talented people to join their team. Let’s broadly classify the start-up folks into two categories. On one hand you have people founding start-ups and on the other, you have people wanting to work in said start-ups. This post is addressed to the second category: the one’s wanting to work in a start-up.

Working in a startup might sound tun and just what you think you’re looking for, but remember that the startup life is not for everybody. Consider some of these points to assess for yourself if working in one is your cup of tea.

Change is the only constant. This age old saying rings true in the case of startups. Whatever else you might have expected, expect this. Since a startup is constantly evolving and figuring out what works best for itself, everybody associated with the startup also needs to evolve. From simpler aspects like office space, to more prominent ones like project direction and scope are all part of the evolution process. Working in such a climate requires you to be able to go with the flow.

That’s not part of my job description. This phase does not exist in a startup. Were you hired to drive marketing efforts, but find yourself often doing so many other things? This fluidity in your work profile is a classic example of how a startup works. If you can cope with multitasking, this is actually quite a boon. You get to learn so much. You get a front row perspective on how a startup works. No job is too small in a startup, be that getting coffee, taking out the trash or locking up.

Expecting a big fat pay check: This one is rather important. Startup life has been significantly glorified. When you interview for a startup, chances are that what you currently make is way beyond their budget or just about within. Let’s not pin our hopes on a huge pay increase from what you’re currently making. Most startups can at best match that number, if even that. What they can offer you though is perhaps equity or stock options. At the very beginning, this means nothing and it may always mean nothing, but if you’ve joined a startup that goes on to become a Facebook, then it means a whole lot. This is a risk you’re taking; assessing this risk is your responsibility. It’s up to you to keep up with news and happenings around the world in the business you are in. That said, if the startup clicks, the payoff can be quite huge!

Work-Life Balance? What’s that? While a start-up offers you flexible timings, you will be spending a lot more time at work. Long days, late nights, all-nighters are all very common. In fact, this is what qualifies as a significant part of team bonding. Long hours usually mean free food and beverages. Know this before you start working for one, if you prefer a nine to five job with evenings free to do your own thing, you’re not in the right place. Having said that, founders recognise the threat of a burn out and various measures are taken to avoid such a situation.

Growth. As a startup grows, the policies will evolve. For example, if you were given free food as a perk, this may no longer be practical with a bigger team. Usually when smaller perks are taken, they give way to long term and more promising perks, like Provident Fund, Insurance, or Bonus. When the company starts to do well, or has raised a round of funding, the founders see this as a good time to bring in someone senior and more experienced for specific roles. As a core team member, you should welcome such talent and not view it as a threat. They are there to teach you and take the start-up forward.

While this list is not exhaustive, it would give you a clear idea on what to expect. Keeping these arguments in mind, make an informed decision on whether the startup life is meant for you or not. If you decide that this is the life for you, prepare to enjoy the amazing experience, but also be prepared for a bit of a roller coaster ride. Good luck!

 

Are you ‘Elevator Pitch’ ready?

The sensibility of investing in start-ups is something that Indian celebrities are warming up to. This is good news. Now, picture this: You have an amazing start-up in the making and are bursting at the …

Read More   2 years ago    
Page 3 of 3123

OUR BLOGGERS

  • Saritha Keshamoni

    Saritha Keshamoni

  • Ramya Sayaboni

    Ramya Sayaboni

  • Sruthi Malla

    Sruthi Malla

  • Ruchika Agarwal

    Ruchika Agarwal

  • Neeha Jayaram

    Neeha Jayaram

  • Sameeksha Bansal

  • Rahul Das

    Rahul Das

  • Srinivas Aki

    Srinivas Aki

  • Saloni Anand

    Saloni Anand

  • Dhivya

    Dhivya

  • Soumalya Chakraborty

    Soumalya Chakraborty

  • Sravya Gowrisetty

    Sravya Gowrisetty

  • Ramesh Loganathan

    Ramesh Loganathan

  • Monika Guwalani

    Monika Guwalani

  • Nischala Agnihotri

    Nischala Agnihotri

  • Nikita Kiran

    Nikita Kiran

  • Harshita Goel

    Harshita Goel

  • Ankur Mehta

    Ankur Mehta

  • Neha Mohsin

    Neha Mohsin

  • Maddy Anand

    Maddy Anand

  • Ayyappa Nagubandi

    Ayyappa Nagubandi

  • Chandra Mouli Koduri

    Chandra Mouli Koduri

  • Ayushi Pandey

    Ayushi Pandey

  • Divya Jyothi

    Divya Jyothi

  • Saptarshi Roy Chaudhury

    Saptarshi Roy Chaudhury

  • Amita Sood

    Amita Sood

  • Surya Vallae

  • Vana Korrapati

    Vana Korrapati

  • Ambika Asta

    Ambika Asta

  • Priyanka Mechineni

    Priyanka Mechineni

  • Anish Tadimarri

  • Vinita Surana

    Vinita Surana

image title here

Some title